"Stonewall" is a series of 60s-influenced original songs that chronologically tell the story of the events of June 27 and 28, 1969.  The songs are arranged for TTBB Men's Chorus.

The style of the music is reminiscent of music of the 60s in order to help capture that specific time. Ideally it should be performed with a small rock band or combo, but would easily work with piano only if necessary, and there are also recorded musical tracks available.

 The music is original and fresh while at the same time having a feeling of familiarity.

There are 9 songs, with a total running time of approximately 32 minutes.

The songs (and timeline)   are:

     No. 1: "I Believe in the Rainbow"

          (June 27th, 1969 - outside Judy's funeral, Manhattan's Upper West Side.)

     No. 2: "Christopher Street"

          (Later that day - the Village.)

     No. 3: "Friends of Dorothy"

          (That night - outside the Stonewall Inn.)

     No.4: "Playin' on the Jukebox"

          (Inside the Stonewall.)

     No. 5: "This Hot Summer Night"

          (The same.)

     No. 6: "What's Going On?" (The Raid)

          (June 28, 1:20 A.M. - inside and outside the Stonewall.)

     No. 7: "Fight Back!" (The Riot)

          (The following hours - the streets.)

     No. 8 : "Sunrise on Shattered Glass"


     No. 9: "Stand Up!"

​          (June 28, 1970 - the first marches to remember: Manhattan, Chicago, Los Angeles.)

​​​The songs include some narration, solos, and occasional spoken word, but the focus is on the harmonies of the male chorus. 

​​On June 27, 1969, Judy Garland's funeral was held in New York City.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.

Between those dates; between Judy and the Moon,  the fight for LGBTQ rights in the US underwent a radical change. The Stonewall Inn uprising was part of that change.

"Between Judy and the Moon: Stonewall" is an emotional remembering of what happened at the Stonewall Inn. Although it is based in fact, it is not a documentary. The documentation that already exists is extensive and thorough, and served as the foundation of this musical  re-telling.  Sources include the book "Stonewall" by David Carter,  the documentaries "Before Stonewall", "After Stonewall", and The American Experience "The Stonewall Uprising" and many others.

In addition, I conducted my own personal interviews with various older gay men willing to tell their stories. Those interviews ultimately were turned over to playwright Terrence McNally prior to his 2006 play, "Some Men".

What this version of the Stonewall story offers that the documentaries do not, is music, and the emotion that only music can inspire. It is my hope that this work can evoke what it "felt" like to be there, and bring a fresh perspective to a chapter in the history of LGBTQ rights.


About the ResearcH

About the Music